Resistance management for sustainable agriculture and improved public health

Colorado potato beetle

Leptinotarsa decemlineata

Leptinotarsa decemlineata is a common pest of solanaceae crops, especially potato, but also eggplant, tomato, pepper and tobacco. The adults appear from hibernation in May, feed on young leaves for 5-10 days, mate, and then immediately start with oviposition. Over a period of 4-5 weeks, each female lays up to ca. 1,000 eggs in clusters of 20-50 on the undersides of leaves. The larvae hatch 3-14 days later. They molt three times, and the four larval instars last 2-4 weeks. The larvae drop to the soil where they build a round cell up to 20 cm deep to pupate there. Pupation lasts a further two weeks, but the completely-developed beetles stay in the soil at least one more week before emerging. Only a few of them use their ability to fly to find new food sources. There are 1-3 generations each year. In October, the adults burrow 20-40 cm (7.87 – 15.75 inch) deep into the soil, where they overwinter.

Colorado potato beetle resistance profile

Several biochemical mechanisms may contribute to the evolution of insecticide resistance. These mechanisms may act separately or in concert. Known resistances occur in the following classes: Carbamates, Group: 1A Organophosphates, Group: 1B Pyrethroids, Group: 3A Neonicotinoids – Group 4A

Species Distribution Chemical class Mechanisms
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Carbamates (1A) Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) target site mutations
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Organophosphates (1B) Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) target site mutations
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Pyrethroids-Pyrethrins (3A) Na+ channels target site mutations
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Cyclodiene organochlorines (2A) GABA receptors target site mutations
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Neonicotinoids (4A) ACh receptors target site mutations
Leptinotarsa decemlineata North America, Asia, Europe Nereistoxin analogues (14) ACh receptors target site mutations

References

Title Year Author(s) Publisher
Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) Vol. 126, pp. 85-91. DOI: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2015.08.002 2016 Malekmohammadi M, Galehdari H Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Incidence and spread of knockdown resistance (kdr) in German Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) populations Vol. 46 (1), pp. 129-138. DOI: 10.1111/epp.12265 2016 Tebbe C, Breckheimer B, Racca P, Schorn C, Kleinhenz B, Nauen R EPPO/OEPP
The global status of insect resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides Vol. 121, pp. 78-87. DOI: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2015.04.004 2015 Bass C, Denholm I, Williamson MS, Nauen R Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Screening test in determination of Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.) sensitivity to insecticides. 4th UNS/PSU Conference, Serbia, Conference Proceedings, pp.115-123 ref.25 2012 Inđić D, Vuković S, Vukša P, Grahovac M, Gvozdenac S, Janković D, Forgić G, Mrdak G CABI
Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE and LdVssc1 confer resistance to pyrethroids and carbamates in Leptinotarsa decemlineata in northern Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region Vol. 100 (1), pp. 74-81. DOI: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2011.02.008 2011 Jiang W-H, Guo W-C, Lu W-P, Shi X-Q, Xiong M-H, Wang Z-T, Li G-Q Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Detection of organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance alleles in Czech Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations by molecular methods Vol. 66 (8), pp. 853-860. DOI: 10.1002/ps.1952 2010 Zichová T, Kocourek F, Salava J, Nad'ová K, Stará J Pest Management Science
Target site insensitivity and mutational analysis of acetylcholinesterase from a carbofuran-resistant population of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) Vol. 84 (3), pp. 165-179. DOI: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2005.07.006 2006 Kim HJ, Dunn JB, Yoon KS, Clark JM Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Application of DNA-based genotyping techniques for the detection of kdr-like pyrethroid resistance in field populations of Colorado potato beetle Vol. 81 (2), pp. 85-96. DOI: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2004.10.002 2005 Kim HJ, Hawthorne DJ, Peters T, Dively GP, Clark JM Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
AFLP-based genetic linkage map of the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata: sex chromosomes and a pyrethroid-resistance candidate gene Vol. 158(2), pp. 695-700 2001 Hawthorne DJ Genetics
DNA-based genotyping techniques for the detection of point mutations associated with insecticide resistance in Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata Vol. 57 (10), pp. 968-974 DOI: 10.1002/ps.369 2001 Clark JM, Lee SH, Kim HJ, Yoon KS, Zhang A Pest Management Science
Molecular Analysis of kdr-like Resistance in a Permethrin-Resistant Strain of Colorado Potato Vol. 63 (2), pp. 63-75. DOI: 10.1006/pest.1999.2395 1999 Lee SH, Dunn JB, Clark JM, Soderlund DM Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Validation of a Point Mutation of Acetylcholinesterase in Colorado Potato Beetle by Polymerase Chain Reaction Coupled to Enzyme Inhibition Assay Vol. 57 (1), pp. 28-35. DOI: 10.1006/pest.1997.2252 1997 Zhu KY, Clark JM Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
A Point Mutation of Acetylcholinesterase Associated with Azinphosmethyl Resistance and Reduced Fitness in Colorado Potato Beetle Vol. 55 (2), pp. 100-108. DOI: 10.1006/pest.1996.0039 1996 Zhu KY, Lee SH, Clark JM Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Genetics and Synergism of Resistance to Azinphosmethyl and Permethrin in the Colorado Potato Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Vol. 82, (3), pp. 698–705. DOI: 10.1093/jee/82.3.698 1989 Argentine JA, Marshall JC, Ferro DN Journal of Economic Entomology
Inheritance of fenvalerate and carbofuran resistance in colorado beetles—Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)—from North Carolina Vol. 34 (4), pp. 303-311. DOI: 10.1002/ps.2780340402 Heim DC, Kennedy GG, Gould FL Pest Management Science

The information provided is based on literature reviews and as such IRAC cannot guarantee or be held accountable for the accuracy of the reports.

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